Parenting in the Age of COVID

2020 was a year for the history books.  It has had a huge impact on how we live our lives, in ways most of us had never imagined. Parenting children in the age of COVID proves to be challenging even in an intact family. Add in separation and divorce and the areas of...

Parenting by Agreement: The New Normal For Divorced Parents

By keeping agreements in divorcing families it is possible to repair trust between parents. Most parents considering divorce have lost the ability to communicate effectively, goodwill isgone and trust obliterated. Creating a financial settlement and parenting plan is...

The Value of Curiosity – Especially in Divorce

When you stay open to the possibility that you do not necessarily know what your partner will say or do and you monitor your assumptions about them, you may be able to maintain a channel of communication that is less fraught with argument and disappointment.  You may still not like what he or she is wanting, but you will at least not like it from the standpoint of knowing that it is what they are actually want.

Will I Have to Pay Spousal Support?

We discussed using a Collaborative Divorce process where Julie is separately represented by a Collaboratively-trained attorney with prior experience on various spousal support outcomes. We could involve mutually agreed upon mental health coaches and/or neutral financial professionals to look at emotional concerns and property division settlement options. This would save them both the cost of hiring different experts to testify in court at $500 or more an hour, while also paying their litigation attorneys’ fees to cross-examine each expert, and waiting 90 days for the judge to make a ruling. And the ruling could be quite unfavorable.