The Value of Curiosity – Especially in Divorce

When you stay open to the possibility that you do not necessarily know what your partner will say or do and you monitor your assumptions about them, you may be able to maintain a channel of communication that is less fraught with argument and disappointment.  You may still not like what he or she is wanting, but you will at least not like it from the standpoint of knowing that it is what they are actually want.

Will I Have to Pay Spousal Support?

We discussed using a Collaborative Divorce process where Julie is separately represented by a Collaboratively-trained attorney with prior experience on various spousal support outcomes. We could involve mutually agreed upon mental health coaches and/or neutral financial professionals to look at emotional concerns and property division settlement options. This would save them both the cost of hiring different experts to testify in court at $500 or more an hour, while also paying their litigation attorneys’ fees to cross-examine each expert, and waiting 90 days for the judge to make a ruling. And the ruling could be quite unfavorable.

My Spouse Won’t Agree to Divorce. What Can I Do?

This blog is a re-post of one of Ann Gold Buscho, Ph.D.’s recent blogs that she uploaded to her website at https://drannbuscho.com.  Dr. Buscho is a nationally recognized author and a blogger at Psychology Today.  Please read on for Dr. Buscho’s important tips to deal...

Should I Rush to File for Divorce before the 10 Year Mark

If you both enter into a Collaborative Divorce process in good faith, don’t rush out to file for divorce or panic if you are on either side of the “ten year” marriage.  Trust that you and your spouse can create an appropriate agreement that doesn’t depend on a knee-jerk reliance on “rules” that may or may not be true.

Why Consider a Collaborative Divorce?

You might choose a Collaborative Divorce because you want to stay out of court, keep conflict to a minimum, and have control over the process. In a Collaborative Divorce, no one enters a courtroom.